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Healthy brain, healthy holiday

As a first step towards acceptance of the changes in my husband [after his diagnosis] I made a phone call to the Alzheimer’s Society of Calgary to sign up for a course. After explaining my intent, and before anything else was said, the person on the other end of the phone asked, “How are you doing?” So unexpected, so sincere, so compassionate, so moving. We chatted for a long time.

- A person who reached out to us

Healthy brain, healthy holiday

Did you know your holiday activities can actually be good for your brain and help reduce your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias?

Follow these helpful hints to ensure you treat your noggin this season, too.

Did you know your holiday activities can be good for your brain and help reduce your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias?
Follow these helpful hints to ensure you treat your noggin, too!

  1. Socialize.
    Getting together with people stimulates your brain and can ward off depression and dementia.
     
  2. Go for a walk, hit the slopes, lace up your skates or hit the dance floor.
    Physical activity increases circulation and sends more oxygen to the brain creating better brain function. It also relieves stress and reduces your risk for vascular dementia.

     
  3. Relax.
    Don’t over-commit yourself and don’t overdo it. You can also make plans for the New Year. Most people will understand because they might also be feeling the pressure!
     
  4. Eat brain-healthy foods, such as a Mediterranean diet.
    In addition to fish, whole grains and nuts, it also includes cheeses and red wine (in moderation).
     
  5. Enjoy in moderation.
    It’s O.K. to enjoy your favourite beverages, but limit your daily alcohol intake to one standard drink for women and two standard drinks for men.
     
  6. Learn a new song, hobby, skill, or instrument. Play games like chess or Scrabble.
    Cognitive activity challenges you and stimulates your brain in new ways.
     
  7. Avoid smoking.
    It affects the health of your blood vessels and increases your risk for vascular dementia.
     
  8. Keep your levels in check.
    Watch your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels.
     
  9. Protect your cranium.
    For outdoor sports, wear a helmet. At home, make your surroundings fall-proof.
     
  10. Reminisce.
    Spend time looking at older photos and videos with loved ones. Aside from taking a great trip down memory lane, you’ll activate those long term memory centers of the brain.


People like you enable us to support thousands of local families impacted by dementia every year.
We wish you the absolute best of the holiday season.